Trumpeter Swans at Jonas Green Park.

It’s that time of year when good birds are few and far between, but each day brings the promise of new arrivals from the north.

I started out  at Jonas Green Park, in the pond adjacent to the entrance. After spotting a few Gadwalls and Hoodies, I suddenly realized there two huge Trumpeter Swans in the rear of the pond. They haven’t been in this pond since Spring, as far as I know. They had three cygnets up in Woolchurch Pond, so I wonder if they’re preparing to leave for the season.

In any event, I’ve been here before, so I suspected what was coming. In just a few minutes they had gathered on the West end of the pond to get the most room, then they pattered noisily across the water until they were airborne, and I was in position to get most of it. A great way to start the day.

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Several Mallards were foraging the pond also.

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A small flock of Hooded Mergansers was feeding early this morning.

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Gadwalls often forage in this pond.

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This is part of the takeoff sequence, A noisy and dramatic affair.

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Gadwalls at Jonas Green Park.

It’s been a pretty birdy three weeks since I posted. Warblers have continued in decent numbers, and kinglets, cuckoos, hawks and waterfowl have added to the numbers.  We did have a three day spell of rain, which seems to have irritated my mild arthritis greatly. Most unpleasant for a day or so.

I got to CBEC a few times, and it’s starting to pick up, with the arrival of a few nice ducks. I may have seen some high flying Tundra Swans, but it was only a quick glance at some high flying birds and I haven’t logged the sighting.

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We only get to see the Tennessee Warbler during migration.

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I usually see Hermit Thrushes in the Fall.

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This White Eyed Vireo was flagged as “Rare” by Ebird due to the late date.

 

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This Yellow Billed Cuckoo was a surprise.

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Kinglets took over the area for several days. This one is a Ruby Crowned.

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Many Eastern Bluebirds were feeding on berries at CCBEC.

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A few Green Winged Teal usually show up at CBEC at this time of year.

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Pintails often stop at Lake Knapp, CBEC.

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Several Northern Pintails are in the area.

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Northern Flickers were migrating through CBEC.

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I saw more Magnolia Warblers this year than usual.

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Mockingbirds are usually resident at Greenbury Point.

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A Yellow Bellied Sapsucker stopped briefly on his journey South.

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Dozens, maybe hundreds of Yellow Rumped Warblers were buzzing through the treetops at CBEC.

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Palm Warblers are always a colorful treat.

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There are Gadwall in the Jonas Green pond every year.

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A few Wood Ducks are still in the pond.

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A single Blackpoll Warbler posed at Greenbury Point.

Cape May Warbler at Greenbury Point.

I’ve been spending more time at Greenbury Point this year than previously. I’ve done reasonably well, and I think I’ve underestimated the potential of this area. Even at its busiest, this government nature preserve is relatively serene and peaceful. There’s still far too many dog walkers with dogs off leash, but that may be improving.

I’m doing well with warblers and other migrants, and several people seem to have stopped by based on my MD Birding posts.  There will be migrant traffic well into October, so I may see some more interesting birds.

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Common Yellowthroats are quite common at Greenbury Point.

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I’ve seen more Black and White Warblers than usual this year.

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I’ve captured this Carolina Wren exuberant singing pose many times.

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Red Eyed Vireos are migrating through in numbers.

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Eastern Phoebes have been present daily.

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This Eastern Phoebe has found a nutritious snack.

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This is a Swainson’s Thrush, which I’ve seen only once before.

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Greenbury Point was overrun with Catbirds this year. Their soft mewing can be heard everywhere.

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Carolina Chickadees are year ’round residents.

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I don’t often get such a good look at Black Throated Blue Warblers.

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This Wood Duck is greeting the day near Jonas Green Park.

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This Cardinal has found a nice stash.

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This Great Blue Heron may have been born in this pond near Jonas Green Park.

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I didn’t recognized this Pectoral Sandpiper which I found at CBEC.

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Several Greater Yellowlegs were foraging at CBEC.

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Several Northern Flickers were feeding together.

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Several Killdeer were searching the mud at CBEC .

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This Cape May Warbler is headed to the Bahamas for the Winter.

Ovenbird at Greenbury Point.

I’ve been getting to Greenbury Point most days, with the occasional visit to the Trumpeter Swans, CBEC, Jonas Green Park and another day at Bombay Hook. The Trumpeter Swan has “Angel Wing”, a debilitating illness that will likely shorten his life if he’s not rescued.  I expect to know more soon.

Greenbury Point has been fruitful most days, bringing many migrating birds like Orioles, Vireo and Warblers.  We had as many as 20 species in one day.

CBEC is showing significant mud, meaning many more shorebirds are visiting, and offering the possibility of interesting photo opps.  Bombay Hook was Bombay Hook  near its best. We haven’t found the cool sandpipers yet, but we got another Virginia Rail.

I’m featuring the Ovenbird because I don’t see many, and it’s a decent image.

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Many Goldfinches call Greenbury Point home.

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Many juvenile White Ibises were visiting Shearness Pool.

 

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American Redstarts are numerous this year.

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Greater Yellowlegs are numerous at Bombay Hook and CBEC.

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Least Sandpipers stay very busy.

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We saw many hundreds of Great Egrets.

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This Downy Woodpecker is a regular visitor at Greenbury Point.

 

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Several Black and White Warblers have been foraging at Greenbury Point.

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A visiting Magnolia Warbler.

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Blue Gray Gnatcatchers were numerous for a few days.

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Great Crested Flycatchers have been prominent at Greenbury Point.

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This image illustrates the cygnet’s “Angel Wing”.

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This Warbling Vireo was a treat, as I don’t see many

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Chestnut sided Warbler

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Many Wood Duck fledglings are visiting the pond near Jonas Green Park.

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Yellow Bellied Flycatchers breed in Canada and the NE USA. They build a cup shaped nest on the ground.

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White Ibises at Bombay Hook.

Lifer! Graeme and I went to Bombay Hook NWR a few days ago. We were nearly overwhelmed by the sheer numbers of birds we saw. Small shorebirds had to be a thousand or more, and Egrets were in several tightly packed bunches. I forget what I put in Ebird, so I’ll attach the list.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S117205126

We mis id’d the Ibis, thinking they were Glossies at first. My excuse is I’d never seen one before. They posed nicely.

Eagles, Terns and Gulls were also numerous. We certainly had a good morning, one of our best.

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Graeme Simpson has a bird in sight.

How many egrets do you see?

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Goldfinches are abundant in Summer.

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Indigo Buntings will be migrating soon.

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American Redstarts have been easy to find for a few days.

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This Orchard Oriole is probably a migrant.

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Great Crested Flycatchers were scarce all summer, and now they’re regulars.

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The Trumpeter Cygnet is doing well.

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Wood Ducks sharing a log with a local turtle.

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These Pileated Woodpeckers are at Beach Road. I have heard them way more often than I’ve seen them.

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There’s often a House Wr4en around at this time of year.

 

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This Black and White Warbler was very entertaing for several minutes.

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A juvenile Baltimore Oriole, headed South.

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This Chestnut Sided Warbler was a surprise.

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We saw hundreds of Great Egrets at Bombay Hook.

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Several Bald Eagles were fishing in the pools.

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There many huge flocks of egrets.

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We saw a dozen or more black Necked Stilts.

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Blue Winged Warbler at Greenbury Point.

Fall migration is definitely underway.  The Blue Winged Warbler was a real treat, but there’s been a moderate trickle of Flycatchers, Gnatcatchers, Orioles and Kingbirds as well. Greenbury Point has been very productive this year.

The Trumpeter Swans continue to do well. The cygnet seems to get bigger every day.

I had cataract surgery on my right eye today. They say I’ll be able to see colors better when they finish next month.

Sunrise at Possum Point.

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This Brown Headed Nuthatch is a resident at CBEC.

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Red Headed Woodpeckers have been nesting at CBEC for several years.

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Ruby Throated Hummingbirds are fueling up for migration.

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Green Herons are common in our local marshes.

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A Blue Gray Gnatcatcher, headed south.

Greenbury Point has always been reliable for Indigo Buntings.

The Blue Winged Warbler is a rare visitor.

There are a few more Orchard Orioles than usual.

Great Crested Flycatchers were hard to find earlier this year.

This Snowy Egret is using his toes as a fishing lure. He flies very slowy, and when his toes gently strike the surface, smaqll fish are often attracted and subsequently snatched up.

Forster’s Terns seem to like the fishing at CBEC.

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This Caspian Tern waws at CBEC.

Eastern Kingbirds seem to gather at Greenbury Point each year.

There are many young Wood Ducks in the mash.

This Osprey lives at Possum Point.

The Trumpeter Swans seem to do nothing but preen and eat.

Cardinals are one of the frequently seen birds in my travels.

A pair of Yellow Warblers appear to be nesting at Greenbury Point.

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This Blue Winged Warbler is a rare visitor during migration.

Yellow Warbler at Greenbury Point

I’ve heard for years there  were Yellow Warblers at Greenbury Point, but this is the first time I’ve found one. I was actually unsure what it was for a moment.

I’m still maintaining the usual routine, but  I managed a trip to Bombay hook with Graeme, and a couple of trips to CBEC, which is starting to pick up a little.

The Trumpeter Swans are doing well.  They seem to spend all their time preening and feeding and presumably sleeping. The book says they feed in the dark, also.

A few other birds have showed up, but this is typically the slowest time of year.

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Sunrise at Possum Point.

Don’t miss the Trumpeter videos.

I saw fewer Great Crested Flycatchers than usual this year.

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Sunrise at Possum Point.

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The Trumpeter Swans are doing well.

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This female Yellow Warbler and a friend stopped briefly at Greenbury Point.

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A few Orchard Orioles usually come through the point each year.

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Green Herons are common this year.

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I don’t see many Great Egrets at Woolchurch Pond, as there’s seldom any mud.

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Many Wood Ducks are fledging.

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Black Crowned Night Herons are unusually common this year.

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Common Yellowthroats are plentiful at Greenbury Point.

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Barn Swallow 2017-21 Beetle 13 Butterfly 42a

 

 

Orchard Orioles at Greenbury Point.

The current routine includes a visit to Woolchurch Pond where the Trumpeter Swans are, then Greenbury/Possum Points, Jonas Green and sometimes Quiet Waters. I’ll get to the Eastern shore soon, but gas prices are slowing me down.

The swans are doing well, and the remaining cygnet is growing rapidly.

Some birds, such as Orioles and Cuckoos, seem to be dispersing after nesting, others are less active now.

Woolchurch Pond.

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Green Herons are patient hunters.

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The pond at Jonas Green Park is home to many new Wood Ducklings.

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The remaining cygnet seems to be thriving.

Many Eastern Bluebirds are raising young.

I don’t often see Brown Thrashers at Greenbury Point.

Greenbury Point hosts Yellow Billed Cuckoos, but I don’t see them often.

Indigo Buntings are regular visitors.

You can always find Chipping Sparrows at Greenbury Point.

Goldfinches are doing very well at Greenbury Point.

I used to see Blue Grosbeaks more often.

This Great Egret was fishing near Jonas Green Park.

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Ospreys are doing well at Possum Point.

Yellow Breasted Chats regularly nest at Greenbury Point.

Who can pass up a singing Cardinal?

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This female Orchard Oriole posed nicely.

Sandhill Cranes at Bombay Hook NWR.

Graeme and I went to Bombay Hook yesterday and had our most successful trip yet. I also got a Virginia Rail (Lifer).

Black Skimmers, Terns, Egrets, a Common Yellowthroat, Eagles, Night Herons and others had us busy snapping photos for several hours. My count was over 1900 photos, the most ever.

There were plenty of flies, and it was getting very hot by 0930. Graeme has some hydrocortisone cream which was very effective for the insect bites.

A Double Crested Cormorant in silhouette.

 

We saw only two Bald Eagles.

There were many Forster’s Terns.

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A few Caspian Terns were fishing with the other birds.

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Common Yellowthroat Warbler.

 

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Virginia Rail, a first for me.

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This Ruddy Duck didn’t migrate.

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Mute Swans are regulars.

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Two Green Herons were fishing in a small pond.

 

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We found 8 or more Black Crowned Night Herons.

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Wood Duck ducklings were numerous.

Many Egrets were feeding in the pools.

This Snow Goose should be long gone.

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We were lucky to find these Sandhill Cranes, who are rare visitors.

Trumpeter Swan Cygnets.

About three years ago I found a pair of Trumpeter Swans near me in Annapolis, MD. The trumpeter Swan Society said they were juveniles and wouldn’t mate for a while yet. They are generally monogamous and mate for life.

Last year it looked as though they were going to mate, but it didn’t happen .This year they started nest building  in early April, and started incubating in late April. This can take over a month, and I found three cygnets this morning.

I’ve got a lot of photos and video, so I’ll just try to post the best of the lot.

This video is from 6/1/22

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These Cygnets are probably two days old.

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Peek-a-boo!

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Trumpeter Swans are the largest flying birds, with big feet and very large eggs.

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I figured out how they were approaching the pond and managed to get some flight shots.

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This was taken at their other hangout,. a pond which has a high embankment.

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