Baltimore Oriole at Governor Bridge Natural Area

I’m posting Saturday’s images on Monday because a sudden cold had me in bed nearly all day yesterday. I’m still not 100%, but much better.

I went to Governor Bridge b cause I’ve done well there in past migrations, but this just hasn’t been my year. Plenty of Orioles, but no other migrants that I saw.

I photographed this Cardinal at an unusual angle.

I photographed this Cardinal at an unusual angle.

I see a lot of Blue Jays, but they don't often pose well.

I see a lot of Blue Jays, but they don’t often pose well.

Lots of Catbirds, everywhere I looked.

Lots of Catbirds, everywhere I looked.

Cornell: "It can be tricky to glimpse a Brown Thrasher in a tangled mass of shrubbery, and once you do you may wonder how such a boldly patterned, gangly bird could stay so hidden. Brown Thrashers wear a somewhat severe expression thanks to their heavy, slightly downcurved bill and staring yellow eyes, and they are the only thrasher species east of Texas. Brown Thrashers are exuberant singers, with one of the largest repertoires of any North American songbird."

Cornell: “It can be tricky to glimpse a Brown Thrasher in a tangled mass of shrubbery, and once you do you may wonder how such a boldly patterned, gangly bird could stay so hidden. Brown Thrashers wear a somewhat severe expression thanks to their heavy, slightly downcurved bill and staring yellow eyes, and they are the only thrasher species east of Texas. Brown Thrashers are exuberant singers, with one of the largest repertoires of any North American songbird.”

Red Eyed Vireos are still hanging around.

Red Eyed Vireos are still hanging around.

I saw 15-20 Baltimore Orioles today.

I saw 15-20 Baltimore Orioles today.

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