Warblers and Catbirds at Terrapin Nature Area

The weather was near perfect once again, with temps in the high 50s, slightly cloudy and warming rapidly. I decided to go to Terrapin Nature Area once again, despite the poor experience of last week. A fortuitous choice. There were warblers in every corner of the park, with Catbirds by the dozen, numerous Flycatchers and plenty of others. Birding paradise.

Black Throated Blue Warbler

Black Throated Blue Warbler

This Black Throated Blue Warbler was the first bird I saw this morning. I have taken several photos previously, but none as good as this one.

Cape May Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

My best guess is Blackpoll Warbler , but I’m checking. My guru says it’s a Cape May Warbler.

Orchard Oriole

This Orchard Oriole’s breast area was overexposed, so I’ve added some yellow to tone it down a bit.

Catbird

There were Catbirds in every corner of the park.

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Warblers can be difficult to capture as they flit quickly form branch to branch, but this Common Yellowthroat was a willing subject.

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher

I saw several Brown Thrashers today.

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warblers were abundant also.

Rabbit

The rabbits at Terrapin seem very tame.

Yellow Warbler

I think this is the first Yellow Warbler I’ve seen at Terrapin.

Black Throated Green Warbler

Black Throated Green Warbler

I’m calling this a Black Throated Green Warbler until corrected.


Chestnut Sided Warbler

Unknown Warbler

I don’t yet know what this is. Now I’m thinking Chestnut Sided Warbler.

Chestnut Sided Warbler

Here’s a different look at this little guy showing the Chestnut colored stripe.

Veery

Terrapin is the only place I’ve seen Veerys.

Snowy Egret

I’m used to seeing Snowy Egrets in the water, so they look weird perched in a tree.

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

There were several Eastern Phoebes flycatching in this thicket.

Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a beautiful bird.

Blackpoll Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

This is a first winter female Blackpoll Warbler, and it’s the first I’ve ever seen.
From Allaboutbirds.org”:
“Cool Facts
The song of the male Blackpoll Warbler is one of the highest-pitched of all birds.
Part of the fall migratory route of the Blackpoll Warbler is over the Atlantic Ocean from the northeastern United States to Puerto Rico, the Lesser Antilles, or northern South America. This route averages 3,000 km (1,864 mi) over water, requiring a potentially nonstop flight of up to 88 hours. To accomplish this flight, the Blackpoll Warbler nearly doubles its body mass and takes advantage of a shift in prevailing wind direction to direct it to its destination.”

Cedar Waxwing

A small flock of Cedar Waxwings was hanging out.

Cedar Waxwing

The adult Cedar Waxwing (Top) was occasionally feeding the juvenile.

Blue Headed Vireo

Not a great shot, but I’m posting this Blue Headed Vireo for bragging rights.

Black Vulture

There are many Black Vultures at Terrapin, and I usually pass them by, but this guy was overlooking all the area.

Unknown

Unknown

I’m working on an ID.

Brown Thrasher

This Brown Thrasher was well hidden.

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