Yellow Rumped Warbler at Greenbury Point

Another gorgeous day for the novice birder. Temps in the high 50s early, quickly warming to the 70s. I had my shirt off by 9:00.
I decided to concentrate on the best spots at Greenbury this morning, so I did a quick tour of Possum Point, then headed to the tree farm at Greenbury, where I spent over 2 hours. I didn’t get any great birds, but I got a few good shots.

Full Moon

It’s hard to pass up a full moon. 6:55 AM at Possum Point.

Chesapeake Bay Bridge

The sky was an unusually intense shade of blue this morning.

Deer

Deer

Several deer were grazing in the tree farm when I arrived.

Eastern Phoebe

I’ve seen many Eastern Phoebes perched on bare limbs or wires, but this perch .seems unusual.

Carolina Wren

The song of the Carolina Wren is constant in the mornings. but they are sometimes hard to spot.

Northern Flicker

I don’t often see Northern Flickers in this area.

Yellow Rumped Warbler

Yellow Rumped Warbler

Yellow Rumped Warbler

If I’m reading the book right, this Yellow Rumped Warbler is a juvenile.


Yellow Rumped Warbler

Here’s a look at the eponymous rump.


Palm  Warbler

Palm  Warbler

Palm  Warbler

Palm  Warbler

The Palm Warbler is a lovely bird, but it helps when he poses in a colorful bush like this one.

Bluebird

Bluebirds were out in abundance.

Eastern Phoebe

If this Eastern Phoebe had been any closer, I would have had to back up to focus.

Magnolia Warbler

This appears to be a Magnolia Warbler.

Song Sparrow

This Song Sparrow appeared just as I was leaving.

Monarch Butterfly

There are still many Monarch Butterflies around.

Sunrise on the Chesapeake Bay

More rain last night, but it ended about 6:00 AM, so I headed off to Greenbury and Possum Points in the near Fall like temperatures. Possum Point was slow, and Greenbury wasn’t much better until I was leaving, when I found a few nice birds among the goldenrod that still blooms in abundance.

Sunrise

Sunrise

Sunrise is often very colorful on the Chesapeake Bay.

Mallard

A Mallard drake and hen enjoy dawn’s early light.

Red Bellied Woodpecker

This Red Bellied Woodpecker is also an early riser.

Sunrise with Ford

This is my old reliable ’96 Ranger, parked at Possum Point.

House Finch

This pair of House Finches may be planning the day’s activities.

Eastern Bluebird

This Eastern Bluebird may remain here for the Winter, or migrate a few miles South.

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrows will often pose patiently.

Palm Warbler

Palm Warbler (Eastern)

The yellow supercilium (Line above the eye) makes this an Eastern Palm Warbler as opposed to the Westerns I frequently see at Greenbury Point.

Blackpoll Warbler

I’m trying to think of a good reason to post this Blackpoll Warbler, who fled just as I was pressing the shutter.

Blackpoll Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

I believe this is a Blackpoll Warbler, but I’m checking.

Double Crested Cormorant

I don’t recall seeing a Double Crested Cormorant out of the water before.

Bronze Headed Cowbird (Juvenile)

I had no idea what this bird was until I found a molting Juvenile Bronze Headed Cowbird (Juvenile) in Sibley’s.

Eastern Phoebe

I saw several Eastern Phoebes today.

Chestnut Sided Warbler

This seems to be a first Winter Chestnut Sided Warbler.

Chickadee

I see a lot of Chickadees, but they don’t often pose this well.

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

I watched this Magnolia Warbler flitting around in the goldenrod for twenty minutes before I could get a good shot.

Sunrise on the Bay With Passerines

More rain last night, but it ended about 6:00 AM, so I headed off to Greenbury and Possum Points in the near Fall like temperatures. Possum Point was slow, and Greenbury wasn’t much better until I was leaving, when I found a few nice birds among the goldenrod that still blooms in abundance.

Sunrise

Sunrise

Sunrise is often very colorful on the Chesapeake Bay.

Mallard

A Mallard drake and hen enjoy dawn’s early light.

Red Bellied Woodpecker

This Red Bellied Woodpecker is also an early riser.

Birding at Possum and Greenbury Points

We had significant rain last night, and there was a slight drizzle when I awoke at 5:00 AM, but the weatherman promised it would be dry for the nerxt 6 hours, so I went off to Possum Point. It was very cloudy, but the temperature rose quickly, and I was in shirt sleeves by 8:30.
It wasn’t a great day, but I got a few decent shots.

Double Crested Cormorant

Double Crested Cormorant

Double Crested Cormorant

These Double Crested Cormorants were fishing right at the tip of the point.

Great Blue Heron

The Osprey nesting platforms don’t go to waste when the Ospreys migrate.

Catbird

Catbird

Catbird

This Catbird will be heading for the Caribbean soon.

Common Yellowthroat Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat Warbler

There’s a stretch of trail at Greenbury Point where I seldom find any birds at all, so this Common Yellowthroat Warbler was a surprise.

Red Eyed Vireo

I only got a quick look at this bird, so I didn’t expect it to be a Red Eyed Vireo.

Palm  Warbler (Western)

Palm  Warbler (Western)

This Palm Warbler is a Summer resident at Greenbury Point.

Great Blue Heron

This Great Blue Heron may have been napping.

Goldfinch

Goldfinch

This Goldfinch is changing to his Winter plumage.

Indigo Bunting

Indigo Bunting

This appears to be an Indigo Bunting.

Blue Grosbeak

This Blue Grosbeak is another who will be leaving us soon.

Cardinal

This bathing Cardinal may have preferred not to be photographed in this state.

Baltimore Oriole at Terrapin Nature Area

It was unseasonably warm this morning, with a slight chance of rain, and I had intended to go to Truxtun Park. As I planned my day, I realized I really wanted to go back to Terrapin, where I’d had such a god day recently so off I went.

Sunrise at Terrapin

The colors were so nice that I stopped to take this image from the field near the marsh ponds.

Catbird

Catbirds have been very active in the park all week.

Mockingbird

Mockingbirds are in every corner of the park.

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

The Baltimore Oriole is actually in the Icterid (Blackbird) family. This female is probably heading to Mexico or Central America for the winter.

Green Heron

There’s a walkway between the two marsh ponds at Terrapin, and I disturb this Green Heron every time I pass though. I feel mildly sorry for him, but it makes him easy to find.

Osprey

This lone Osprey treated me to a fishing exhibition. Most of his brothers have headed South.

Red Bellied Woodpecker

This Red Bellied Woodpecker was one of many birds in a small area of the park where I took pictures for about an hour.

Blue Jay

Large numbers of Blue Jays continued to pass over the park.

Cedar Waxwing

A small flock of Cedar Waxwings was flycatchiing in the treetops.

Flicker

Flicker

Flicker

This Northern Flicker is giving is a good look at the patterns and colors on his back.

Tennessee Warbler

Tennessee Warbler

This is only the second Tennessee Warbler I’ve seen.

Red Eyed Vireo

I saw several Red Eyed Vireos foraging in the brush.

Cardinal

Cardinal

Male and female Cardinals were present in abundance.

Rose Breasted Grosbeak

This Rose Breasted Grosbeak appears to be a non breeding adult male.

Flycatcher

Flycatcher

I’m calling this an Empid Flycatcher until I get a better name.

Scarlet Tanager

Occasionally I get surprised when I upload images from the camera, and that’s the case with this bird, which appeared to be an oriole when I saw it. Lo and behold, it’s a non breeding Scarlet Tanager.

Yellow Billed Cuckoo and Blue Gray Gnatcatcher at Terrapin Nature Area

Fall is the best time of year in Maryland. It was another gorgeous morning after last night’s showers. Temps were in the 60s early and quickly rose to the 70s, with a few clouds. I headed off to Terrapin Nature Area in hopes of another great migrant day, but it was not to be. Still, I saw hundreds of Blue Jays heading South and got a few interesting birds to pose.

Wood Duck

These female Wood Ducks were a little too far away, but it’s a sign the ducks are coming, and I’m looking forward to it.

Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

The Blue Gray Gnatcatcher is a Neotropical migrant, and will be headed to Mexico or the Bahamas soon.

I don’t see these handsome birds often.

Green Heron

The marsh pond has been a consistent site for Green Herons.

House Wren

I was lucky to get this House Wren, who only appeared briefly.

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

I saw very few warblers today, so I was glad this Magnolia Warbler posed briefly.

Deer Skull

I was chatting with the gate keeper, who brings his dog for a walk every day when he opens the gate, and the dog bounded out the brush with this Deer Skull.

Blue Jay

Hundreds of Blue Jays flew overhead today, heading South. I had no ide of this phenomenon.
From Allaboutbirds.org:
“Cool Facts
Thousands of Blue Jays migrate in flocks along the Great Lakes and Atlantic coasts, but much about their migration remains a mystery. Some are present throughout winter in all parts of their range. Young jays may be more likely to migrate than adults, but many adults also migrate. Some individual jays migrate south one year, stay north the next winter, and then migrate south again the next year. No one has worked out why they migrate when they do. “

Butterfly

I haven’t identified this butterfly yet.

Warblers and Catbirds at Terrapin Nature Area

The weather was near perfect once again, with temps in the high 50s, slightly cloudy and warming rapidly. I decided to go to Terrapin Nature Area once again, despite the poor experience of last week. A fortuitous choice. There were warblers in every corner of the park, with Catbirds by the dozen, numerous Flycatchers and plenty of others. Birding paradise.

Black Throated Blue Warbler

Black Throated Blue Warbler

This Black Throated Blue Warbler was the first bird I saw this morning. I have taken several photos previously, but none as good as this one.

Cape May Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

My best guess is Blackpoll Warbler , but I’m checking. My guru says it’s a Cape May Warbler.

Orchard Oriole

This Orchard Oriole’s breast area was overexposed, so I’ve added some yellow to tone it down a bit.

Catbird

There were Catbirds in every corner of the park.

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Warblers can be difficult to capture as they flit quickly form branch to branch, but this Common Yellowthroat was a willing subject.

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher

I saw several Brown Thrashers today.

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia Warblers were abundant also.

Rabbit

The rabbits at Terrapin seem very tame.

Yellow Warbler

I think this is the first Yellow Warbler I’ve seen at Terrapin.

Black Throated Green Warbler

Black Throated Green Warbler

I’m calling this a Black Throated Green Warbler until corrected.


Chestnut Sided Warbler

Unknown Warbler

I don’t yet know what this is. Now I’m thinking Chestnut Sided Warbler.

Chestnut Sided Warbler

Here’s a different look at this little guy showing the Chestnut colored stripe.

Veery

Terrapin is the only place I’ve seen Veerys.

Snowy Egret

I’m used to seeing Snowy Egrets in the water, so they look weird perched in a tree.

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

There were several Eastern Phoebes flycatching in this thicket.

Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a beautiful bird.

Blackpoll Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

This is a first winter female Blackpoll Warbler, and it’s the first I’ve ever seen.
From Allaboutbirds.org”:
“Cool Facts
The song of the male Blackpoll Warbler is one of the highest-pitched of all birds.
Part of the fall migratory route of the Blackpoll Warbler is over the Atlantic Ocean from the northeastern United States to Puerto Rico, the Lesser Antilles, or northern South America. This route averages 3,000 km (1,864 mi) over water, requiring a potentially nonstop flight of up to 88 hours. To accomplish this flight, the Blackpoll Warbler nearly doubles its body mass and takes advantage of a shift in prevailing wind direction to direct it to its destination.”

Cedar Waxwing

A small flock of Cedar Waxwings was hanging out.

Cedar Waxwing

The adult Cedar Waxwing (Top) was occasionally feeding the juvenile.

Blue Headed Vireo

Not a great shot, but I’m posting this Blue Headed Vireo for bragging rights.

Black Vulture

There are many Black Vultures at Terrapin, and I usually pass them by, but this guy was overlooking all the area.

Unknown

Unknown

I’m working on an ID.

Brown Thrasher

This Brown Thrasher was well hidden.

Hawk versus Crow:Battle at Possum Point

It was a cool, clear dry morning, perfect for birding. I headed for Possum Point, arriving a little after dawn. After checking the point for seabirds, I headed back up the hill, and was treated to a stand off between a Cooper’s Hawk and some crows who didn’t want him in the ‘hood. The hawk was adamant about remaining perched in a large dead tree, and counter-attacked several times before moving to a nearby pine where the harassment continued. He eventually left the area, but the struggle for dominance was a sight to see, and the sort of thing that keeps birders coming back for more. I continued on to Greenbury Point, where I got a few nice shots.

Great Blue Heron

Now that the Ospreys have left, this Great Blue Heron has occupied their nesting platform as a resting spot.

Turkey Vulture

I’ve seen Turkey Vultures in this tree before, but it, too, is usually occupied by Ospreys.

Ring Billed Gull

This piling at the tip of the point is almost always occupied by a seabird like this Ring Billed Gull.

Cooper's Hawk

As I headed up the hill from the point, I heard a loud racket from several Crows, and it quickly became apparent they were mobbing this Cooper’s Hawk, lower left in the dead tree.

Cooper's Hawk

After taking some distant shots, I crept closer to get a better look. I may not have succeeded had the hawk not been so pre-occupied with the Crows.

Cooper's Hawk

When I’ve seen hawks mobbed in the past, they have usually been quickly driven off, but this guy elected to attack the Crows. Here, he is heading up to do battle.

Cooper's Hawk

The Crow recognized the threat, and quickly took off, but not for long.

Cooper's Hawk

As the Crow left, the hawk banked to return to his perch.

Cooper's Hawk

The Crows quickly returned and continued their harassment.

Cooper's Hawk

The hawk attacked once more.

Cooper's Hawk

He returned to the tree, and here he’s scanning for the Crow’s return.

Cooper's Hawk

He finally gives me a relatively unobstructed look.

Cooper's Hawk

The Crows don’t give up easily.

Cooper's Hawk

A good look from the front.

Cooper's Hawk

The Crows returned and he attacked once more.

Cooper's Hawk

The Crows don’t give up easily.

Cooper's Hawk

Even though they’re of a similar size, the Hawk has no fear of the Crow.

Cooper's Hawk

The battle continues.

Cooper's Hawk

The Hawk is running out of patience.

Cooper's Hawk

Close call!

Cooper's Hawk

The Crows are as determined as the Hawk.

Cooper's Hawk

I was amazed the battle had continued this long. (8 minutes by this time).

Cooper's Hawk

Finally, he’s driven off to a nearby tree.

Great Crested Flycatcher

This appears to be a Great Crested Flycatcher.

Eastern Phoebe

He’s small and far away, but he appears to be an Eastern Phoebe.

Eastern Phoebe

A closer look at our Eastern Phoebe.

Bay-Bridge

A look at the Bay-Bridge from Possum Point.

Rock Dove

I’ve been taking bird pictures for about a year, and this is the first Rock Dove (Feral Pigeon) I’ve been in a position to photograph. In fact, I nearly stepped on him.

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Grosbeak

This Blue Grosbeak will be migrating soon.

Palm  Warbler

I need a remote branch clipper for birds that pose like this Palm Warbler.

Mockingbird

Mockingbirds may be the bird I see most often.

Anne Arundel Bird Club Outing at Bacon Ridge

I belong to a Facebook group sponsored by the AA Bird Club, and when they announced a trip to Bacon Ridge (Near the old Crownsville State Hospital) I invited myself along, and I’m glad I did. Dan Haas, birder extraordinaire, led the group, and showed us some wonderful spots, full of migrants and native birds. I got to meet some of the members, whom I only knew through Facebook posts, and we all enjoyed a 4 hour trek. I haven’t looked at all the images yet, but I think there are a few good ones.

Killdeer

A very handsome bird. Here’s the Wikipedia entry:
“Adults have a brown back and wings, a white belly, and a white breast with two black bands. The rump is tawny orange. The face and cap are brown with a white forehead. They have an orange-red eyering. The chicks are patterned almost identically to the adults, and are precocial — able to move around immediately after hatching. The Killdeer frequently uses a “broken wing act” to distract predators from the nest. It is named onomatopoeically after its cry

Wester Palm Warbler

This Western Palm Warbler was hanging out near one of the ponds.

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

This appears to be a juvenile Eastern Phoebe, a first for me.

Northern Flicker

This Northern Flicker posed patiently.

Bay Breasted Warbler

This may be a Bay Breasted Warbler.

Eastern Wood Peewee

I’m calling this an Eastern Wood Peewee.

Magnolia Warbler

This Magnolia Warbler was one of many warblers we saw in the swampy area at the base of Mount Everest. I was unable to capture most of them as they were very fast and often deep in the trees.

Black and White Warbler

I’ve seen several Black and White Warblers. but this is my best photo of one by far.

American Redstart

I couldn’t get this American Redstart in focus, but I like this bird so I’m posting it anyway.